Recent Nursing Home Neglect and Abuse Articles

New Oklahoma Nursing Home Law Permits Cameras in Rooms

A new law went into effect on Friday in Oklahoma that allows the family of residents to install surveillance cameras in their family members’ rooms to look out for, and hopefully prevent, nursing home abuse and nursing home neglect.

The law, The Protect Our Loved Ones Act” went into effect on Friday. It requires residents to fill out a form and submit it to the nursing home administrators before the family can install the cameras, according to a story by KFOR-TV in Oklahoma City.

Elderly care abuse can take many different forms, including physical, sexual or mental. It reduces quality of life for the victims and robs them of dignity, as well as possibly inflicting permanent and debilitating physical damage. Recognizing the signs of abuse can be difficult, and in many cases the victims are too humiliated to talk about what occurred. Signs of elderly care abuse can include:

  • Unusual injuries or broken bones
  • Unexplained loss of hair
  • Changes in behavior of nursing home staff towards a resident, or residents toward one another.

Ohio Nursing Home Employee Faces Abuse Charges

A Dayton nursing home employee has been hit with nursing home abuse charges for allegedly slapping a resident.

According to a story on whiotv.com, Norma Black, 70 was employed at Arbors at Dayton Subacute and Rehabilitation Center as an activity assistant in March 2012 when state investigators say the abuse occurred. Her arraignment is scheduled for May 28.

Elderly care abuse can take many different forms, including physical, sexual or mental. It reduces quality of life for the victims and robs them of dignity, as well as possibly inflicting permanent and debilitating physical damage. Recognizing the signs of abuse can be difficult, and in many cases the victims are too humiliated to talk about what occurred. Signs of elderly care abuse can include:

  • Unusual injuries or broken bones
  • Unexplained loss of hair
  • Changes in behavior of nursing home staff towards a resident, or residents toward one another.

 

Indiana Family Blames Nursing Home for Woman’s Murder

The family of an Indiana woman say that nursing home neglect led to her murder in 2011.

Betty J. Riley died on December 13, 2011 after the 88-year-old was pushed by another resident several days earlier and fell in Summit City Nursing & Rehabilitation in Indiana. The nursing home wrongful death lawsuit filed by her family say that the nursing home should have protected her. Her death was ruled a homicide.

The lawsuit also claims that the facility’s officials failed to tell the family about the fall, which led to an egg-sized hematoma on her head. The family did not find out about the incident until she was hospitalized on December 5, two days after she was pushed. The family claims nursing home officials told her a stroke caused the fall, according to a story in the News-Sentinel.

Iowa Nursing Home Fined Following Deaths

The deaths of two patients at an Iowa elderly care facility has led to nursing home neglect fines.

Iowa state inspectors have fined the Golden Age Nursing and Rehabilitation Center $15,000 for failing to provide the minimum amount of required care to two residents who died late last year. The fines were over the deaths of 91-year-old Mable Stafford and 89-year-old Freda King.

According to a story in the Des Moines Register, Stafford died of pneumonia in early November. Her doctor stated that the facility failed to provide information about her condition that could have led to a change in medication or treatment.

King suffered two nursing home falls in October, resulting in two hip fractures. Three weeks later the family requested that she be hospitalized due to her condition. The hospital discovered she was suffering from an untreated urinary tract infection, dehydration and malnutrition. Again, her doctor told state officials there facility failed to provide information about her condition.

The owners of the facility say they will appeal the fines.

Iowa Nursing Home Fined Following Deaths

The deaths of two patients at an Iowa elderly care facility has led to nursing home neglect fines.

Iowa state inspectors have fined the Golden Age Nursing and Rehabilitation Center $15,000 for failing to provide the minimum amount of required care to two residents who died late last year. The fines were over the deaths of 91-year-old Mable Stafford and 89-year-old Freda King.

According to a story in the Des Moines Register, Stafford died of pneumonia in early November. Her doctor stated that the facility failed to provide information about her condition that could have led to a change in medication or treatment.

King suffered two nursing home falls in October, resulting in two hip fractures. Three weeks later the family requested that she be hospitalized due to her condition. The hospital discovered she was suffering from an untreated urinary tract infection, dehydration and malnutrition. Again, her doctor told state officials there facility failed to provide information about her condition.

The owners of the facility say they will appeal the fines.

Windsor Care Facility Sued Over Choking Death

A Canadian woman has filed a $6 million nursing home neglect lawsuit in an effort to get new measures put in place to prevent incidents of patients choking on food.

The nursing home wrongful death lawsuit was filed by Lisa Joseph on behalf of her father, Michael Joseph, against Heron Terrace Long Term Care Community in Windsor, Ontario in Canada. Joseph says that she wants the case to result in changes in how nursing homes feed residents.

Many hospitals use wristbands on patients to identify dietary requirements, and some experts believe that a similar practice instituted at nursing homes could prevent patients from being fed the wrong foods. Joseph hopes her lawsuit can push that to be a mandatory requirement at senior care facilities. Michael Joseph choked to death after being accidentally fed solid food, instead of the pureed food he should have been served, according to a story in The Windsor Star.

Poison Mushrooms Kill 4 California Nursing Home Residents

A California senior care home worker has accidentally killed four residents by feeding them poisonous mushrooms, state officials say.

Dorothy Mary Hart, 92, Barbara Lopes, 86, Teresa Olesniewicz, 73, and Frank Warren Blodget, 90, have all died after being fed mushrooms picked on the six-bed facility’s grounds on November 8. All were residents of Gold Villa senior care home in Loomis, California. Another resident and the caregiver were hospitalized. The mushrooms were fed to the residents in a soup, and the only resident who did not fall ill was the one who did not eat the soup that night.

State officials say that it is not illegal to feed foraged foods to elderly nursing home residents and it is not immediately being considered nursing home neglect. Placer County Sheriff’s Department officials say they have classified it as a “tragic accident” according to an ABCNews.com story.

 

Worker Accused of Photographing Florida Nursing Home Residents

A Florida nursing home employee faces charges that he broke with patient confidentiality laws by illegally photographing residents at a Ocala nursing home.

The Florida Department of Health has filed an administrative complaint against Donald Edward Berry, a licensed practical nurse at Oakhurst Care and Rehabilitation Center. Seeking to have his license revoked, the state claims he showed unprofessional conduct by taking photographs of two nursing home residents and sending them to others. The state could also seek further disciplinary action.

The Florida Board of Nursing must approve the state’s request. However, Berry has already had his license suspended for testing positive for cocaine, according to a story in the Gainesville Sun.

The state considers Berry’s alleged actions a form of nursing home abuse because it violates the rights of patient confidentiality.

Man Charged With Assaulting Springfield Nursing Home Resident

A man faces sexual assault charges for allegedly fondling an Ohio nursing home resident.

Police say they found DNA evidence linking Larry Edward Thompson to a developmentally delayed woman who claimed he molested her while visiting someone else at Heartland of Springfield nursing home in Springfield in June. Thompson was arrested on Wednesday and is denying the charges.

The victim claims Thompson told her he would kill her if she told anyone about the assault, according to a story by wdtn.com.

Elderly care abuse can take many different forms, including physical, sexual or mental. It reduces quality of life for the victims and robs them of dignity, as well as possibly inflicting permanent and debilitating physical damage. Recognizing the signs of abuse can be difficult, and in many cases the victims are too humiliated to talk about what occurred. Signs of elderly care abuse can include:

  • Unusual injuries or broken bones
  • Unexplained loss of hair
  • Changes in behavior of nursing home staff towards a resident, or residents toward one another.

Vermont Veterans Home Loses Funding Due to Neglect, Abuse

A Vermont veteran’s home has lost its federal funding and will likely close following a report that a nurse punched a veteran in the face.

The Vermont Veterans’ Home will stop receiving federal funding as of October 28, according to a notice of termination filed by the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The decertification of the facility, which houses 137 veterans and spouses of veterans, followed numerous reports of nursing home neglect and nursing home abuse in inspections in March and earlier this month.

One such incident involved a nurse punching an 82-year-old veteran in the face. The nurse, Mark Demasi, said he instinctively hit Elroy Whidden after Whidden hit him in the groin, according to a story by Vtdigger.org.

The CMS funding accounts for about $10 million to $12 million of the facility’s $19 million budget. That money would have to be made up by the state in order to keep the facility open.